How to Grow Tomatoes in outdoor cement pot

We planted our tomatoes and tended them carefully. They grew, sometimes to astounding size. But they always fell victim to the bacterial wilt endemic to our soil. The tomatoes of our dreams, meaty and juicy with a balance of sweet and acid, always eluded us.

We knew that growing tomatoes in the usual way would never produce anything but frustration. Thus we began to experiment with growing tomatoes in large concrete pots. The work came to involve not just soil but also tactics to fend off high humidity, broiling heat, frosts, and insects, insects, insects. Our efforts evolved into a system that works well in our small space.

garden-catwalk

garden-catwalk

We began with large concrete pots and whiskey barrel halves. Both proved impractical. Cement pots large enough to retain water for more than an hour in late July were too heavy to move and big trouble to sanitize at the end of the season. The half-barrels were even more unwieldy. They provided a haven for wood roaches, which like tomatoes almost as much as we do, and they were also susceptible to termites.

When the barrels fell apart in the third year, we sighed with relief and purchased 20-in. plastic pots and saucers. They are colored and styled to look like old fashioned concrete pot. At the end of each year, we scrub them to remove most of the dirt, mold, and algae, and then drop them into our heavily chlorinated swimming pool for cleaning. Dollies my husband made allow us to move the potted tomato plants around the patio with ease.

Good drainage and healthy roots go together. At first, we tried to achieve the goal by layering pebbles in the bottom of each cement pot. However, at the end of the season we wanted to dump the exhausted potting mix into our raised-bed vegetable garden. Deliberately adding rocks to our garden beds seemed perverse.

So we moved the river rock into the saucer instead. But we also line the bottom of each concrete pot with a layer or two of plastic window screening, cut to fit. Our soil stays put and drains well.

Succulents-in-Birdbath-Container-Garden

Succulents-in-Birdbath-Container-Garden

In heavy rains, we siphon the nutrient-saturated liquid from the saucers with a turkey baster demoted from the kitchen. We recycle the liquid, conserving nutrients and getting rid of the standing water mosquitoes love for breeding.

We fill each pot with 6 in. to 8 in. of potting soil and set a transplant at the bottom of the garden cement pot. As the tomatoes grow, we trim the leaves from the stem and add more of the enriched soil mix until the pot is filled. This practice helps build root mass along the stem as it is buried, which is similar to laying the stem in a trench.

This method also allows us to plant earlier. Since the plants stay below the pot rim for a couple weeks, we can cozy the plants in old mattress pads if there’s a cold snap or cover them with old shower curtains if there’s a deluge. Best of all, we can tie layers of nylon netting over each pot to keep early insect marauders at bay.

Wonderful Winter tall concrete pots

During the cold months of January and February, when the setting is bleak and the sky is gray, winter containers can cheer up the soul and provide a colorful punch to the landscape. Many gardeners give up on their potted creations in the fall, but that can be a horrible waste because winter is when color and interest are most vital.

cement container plant

cement container plant

Creating a winter design is not difficult. The general rule for container-plant survival through the winter is to use plants hardy to at least two zones colder than your USDA Hardiness Zone; this, however, is not always a steadfast rule. Many trees, shrubs, and peren­nials that are hardy in your zone will live and even thrive in containers through all four seasons. In this case, a frostproof pot with a drainage hole is important. Cement pots are the best weather-resistant containers to use.

Assemble your designs early enough that the plants have time to acclimate to their new tall concrete pots before the hard freeze. Also, winter containers usually need to be checked only monthly for water to make sure they haven’t dried out; when the soil eventually becomes frozen solid, watering is no longer necessary. Apply an antidesiccant such as Wilt-Pruf to broad-leaved evergreens and to branches of cut greens to protect against drying winter winds. When it comes to design, I like to use a mix of live plants, cut branches, colorful berries, and interesting evergreen foliage to dress up the pots for maximum seasonal appeal.

 

container

container

The vibrant colors of this tall concrete pot planting set it apart. Red­twig dog­wood’s scarlet stems are strikingly prominent and add a structural component to the container. To highlight them, it helps to have a solid evergreen background so that the thin branches stand out. Surrounding the base of the dogwood are two small Japanese pieris, whose glossy, dark green leaves provide bulk and texture to the design. The lemon yellow foliage of ‘Golden Sword’ yucca complements the dogwood. Two perennials, ‘Bressingham Ruby’ bergenia and ‘Caramel’ heuchera, are tucked around the bottom of the pot to add an additional punch of color. The ‘Ivory Tower’ Japanese hollies on each side of the dogwood add more color interest with their creamy yellow berries. Branches of gold-thread sawara echo the yellow tones from the holly berries. The result is a colorful explosion dy­namic enough to brighten the grayest of winter days.

Many people feel that winter containers are a waste of time because they can’t be appreciated when covered in snow or ice. Using strong architectural forms in your containers will allow them to stand out even when encased in snow. Hardy ‘Green Mountain’ boxwood has this kind of profile. Its clean, simple lines stand out against almost any backdrop, especially when dusted with snow. To highlight the dark foliage of the boxwood, I pair it with the slender leaves of silver-variegated Japanese sedge. The soft green and white mottled foliage of ‘Snow Angel’ heuchera gives mass to the arrangement, and ‘Angelina’ sedum is wedged in for its cascading tendency. The yellow pansies may not survive throughout the winter but are wonderful for a short time. The strong form of this design will make it a showstopper throughout winter.

 

Although the hues featured in this tall concrete pot are not necessarily traditional, they are still dramatic and seasonally appropriate. The strong vertical form of the evergreen beaked yucca makes it a perfect focal point for a design. The dark foliage of a ‘Plum Pudding’ heuchera provides contrasting color at the base of the combination, and steely blue cut stems of smooth cypress pick up the silvery hues of the shimmering hairs along the edges of the yucca. With their opposing shape and color, orange winterberry branches also accentuate the sculptural yucca leaves. These fruits usually form earlier than red winterberry, so the berries do not last as long on the branch, but the color is worth the effort. The thick vertical leaves of the yucca and unexpected hues of this design stand out in winter, despite the absence of traditional red and green.

Staging a Container Plant Display

I have a passion for plants in cement pots. I grow them by the score in a sprawling garden of containers arranged like a border on my patio. By early summer, my garden of 50 or so cement pots of annuals, tender perennials, and the odd hardy plant has become an extravaganza of texture, fragrance, and color. To keep things lively as the plants grow, I simply move the containers—farther apart, up, down, to the front, to the rear—to create a display that is always evolving. The portability of plants in large cement pots frees me from some of the constraints of traditional earthbound gardening. It gives me the flexibility to tweak my jungle all season, adding bits of color as something new comes into prominence or removing anything that’s past its prime.

pic_container_care_1

pic_container_care_1

And although I take a more-is-merrier approach to container gardening, numbers alone don’t mean much. Five large cement pots are enough to create a dramatic composition on a porch or patio. The trick is not how many pots you have, but what you do with them. And for raising my container garden’s beauty to new heights, the use of simple staging—by which I mean the overturned nursery pots, bulb crates, logs, and homemade plant stands that give plants and ornaments a boost—has been the greatest trick of all.

By placing short but stellar plants atop staging that’s hidden amid other plants, I can create compelling combinations that wouldn’t be possible with plants grown in the ground. I especially like a combination of rubylike Euphorbia cotinifolia foliage and the coral-colored flowers of Fuchsia ‘Coralle’. Unfortunately, the euphorbia is about 4 feet tall and the fuchsia, a mere 2 feet. But by giving the fuchsia a boost on a foot-tall support, I can unify the two, adding a few coleus—also piggy-backed on stands of varied heights— to round out the combination.

I’ve also found that staging can be a real boon to creating color echoes in my container border. Coleus and dahlias, for example, seem made for each other since it’s easy to find a coleus with colorful foliage to match the hue of almost any dahlia. But the dahlias I like are 3 or 4 feet tall, while few coleus top 30 inches. By giving the coleus a boost of a foot or two, their decorative foliage becomes a colorful companion to the dahlias’ floral fireworks.

pot-eclectic-landscape

pot-eclectic-landscape

Staging is also a good way to make the most of fast-growing plants in a container display. Golden fruit of the Andes, the big-leaved plant in the center of the display in the opening photo, is a plant I love for its huge, furry, spiked leaves, but it grows so quickly it’s hard to maintain it in a starring, close-up role. So early in the season I raise it on staging to a position of prominence, then as the plant grows, move it to shorter platforms until finally, by late August, there’s no need for any staging at all. Small, slow-growing plants as well as plants that display flowers with strong visual appeal or fragrance can also benefit from staging by bringing them closer to eye level.

Staging can also be an effective way to display ornaments such as small fountains, sculptures, or handsome empty pots.In a container garden it’s easy to place ornaments where they look best, and with staging, the options are unlimited. I have a fountain of copper large cement pots but it’s only about 18 inches tall and would be immediately overwhelmed by a surround of abutilon, dahlias, and coleus. So, I just piggyback the fountain on some staging, and it rises to a place of honor.

Almost anything can serve as a plant stand, provided it’s tall enough to lift the plant to the desired height, stable enough not to topple in the wind, and sturdy enough not to collapse when the pot on top gets a heavy watering. I’ve found that heavy-duty black plastic nursery pots work well, the kind that usually contain small trees or large shrubs. Their only drawback is their rather limited range, typically 10 to 18 inches high. For something taller, I often use logs that measure a foot or so in diameter, cut to length. For larger supports that will hold several large cement pots at once, I sometimes use overturned bulb crates, the hard plastic containers used for shipping bulbs. If need be, they can be stacked one atop another. I’ve also built benchlike stands using 2×10 or 2×12 pressure-treated lumber. All it takes is a length of lumber and two shorter pieces for legs.

terrazzo pot plants

terrazzo pot plants

To further the illusion that some of my plants are of unusual height, I hide supports behind a rank of containers planted with sprawling lantanas or coleus, which act as a ground cover. For plant stands that will be visible, options include attractive concrete or ceramic supports available at many garden centers. In winter, I sometimes retreat to my basement workshop to build plant stands out of pine lumber. I make them whatever height I want, embellish them with ornamental molding, then add a coat of paint. All these supports really give my garden a boost and give me the chance to rejigger a border without digging anything up.

Growing thyme in a cement pot

Plant thyme in your herb garden, at the edge of a walk, along a short garden wall, or in cement planter. As a special garden treat, put a few along a walkway and between steps, and your footsteps will release its aroma. It even makes a pretty patch of small ground cover. Growing thyme provides an anchor in an herb garden in areas where it is evergreen in winter. Thyme is also perfect for cement pot, either alone or in combination with plants that won’t shade it out. The flowers open in spring and summer, sprinkling the plant with tiny, two-lipped blossoms attractive to bees.

Growing-Harvesting in cement planter

Growing-Harvesting in cement planter

Soil, Planting, And Care

Thyme does best in full sun. Start from young plants set out in spring after the last frost. Plant in well-drained soil with a pH of about 7.0; it prefers slightly alkaline conditions. Add lime to the pot or ground to raise the pH if needed. Also add a slow-release fertilizer to the soil at or before planting and again each spring. Thyme must have excellent drainage. Mulching with limestone gravel or builder’s sand improves drainage and prevents root rot. German thyme is perennial in zones 5 to 9, lemon thyme in zones 7 to 9. Easy to grow, thyme needs little care except for a regular light pruning after the first year. Do this after the last spring frost, so that the plants do not get woody and brittle. Pinching the tips of the stems keeps plants bushy, but stop clipping about a month before the first frost of fall to make sure that new growth is not too tender going into the cool weather. Cut thyme back by one third in spring, always cutting above points where you can see new growth, never below into the leafless woody stem. Lemon thyme is more upright and more vigorous than the other thymes. In the North and cold climates, cover with pine boughs after the soil freezes to help protect from winter damage. In zone 10, thyme is usually an annual, often succumbing to heat and humidity in mid-summer.

thyme-herb in cement pot

thyme-herb in cement pot

Troubleshooting

Spider mites can be a problem in dry weather. Also watch out for root rot and fungus diseases in humid climates. Good drainage, good air circulation, and proper planting as described above will help prevent disease.

Harvest And Storage

Harvest leaves as you need them, including through the winter in places where it is evergreen. Although the flavor is most concentrated just before plants bloom, thyme is so aromatic that the leaves have good flavor all the time. Strip the tiny leaves from woody stems before using.

If you want to find a cement pot manufacturer in Vietnam. Please contact us!

Why growing vegetables and herbs in a cement pot

If you do not have room to grow lots of vegetables, grow cement pots of vegetables. Why grow vegetables in pots? The reasons are many, but here are a few:

lightweight concrete pot

lightweight concrete pot

Convenience: Nothing is more convenient when you need a tomato or a pinch of fresh basil than to step out the kitchen door to your container garden of vegetables and herbs.

Sun: Sometimes the sun you need to grow veggies and herbs is only found on a patio, deck, or the edge of the driveway. For full-sun plants (check the plant’s stick tag for sun requirements), put cement pots wherever you can see your shadow most of the day. If you live in an apartment or condo, containers may be the only space available.

Perfect Soil: Often the soil around a newer home is poor because it is down to the subsoil and compacted by machinery. You will spend less time, money, and effort to plant in cement pot of potting mix until you can build good soil in a garden spot.

Less Water: It takes less water to keep a few pots watered than to water a plot of ground. In fact, catching water that would otherwise be wasted makes gardening in pots most efficient. Just keep a watering can by the sink and fill it with cool water any time you are waiting for the hot water to make its way from the tank to the tap.

Plant vigor: Wherever you live, your soil may be heavy with clay or too much dry sand. Growing vegetables in potting mix makes plants grow faster and remain healthier, giving you the most produce for your effort, at least until you can build up the soil in the ground.

Enabling: Children take to a container garden because the soil is good, success is likely, pots are easy to reach, and they can call a pot their own. Likewise, a container is appealing to an older gardener or a physically challenged gardener because there is less bending and the project is a manageable size. Both may need help with the initial set up because of the weight of large pots and bags of soil.

Beat soil problems: Growing things in pots avoids serious, persistent soil-borne problems such as sweet potato weevils, septoria leaf spot, or root knot nematodes. This is good alternative if you just can’t get these problems under control in your garden plot.

Vietnam Light Cement Trough

Vietnam Light Cement Trough

Light Cement Trough

Light Cement Trough

Size 100x41x41 83x30x30 58x19x19

Color
Material Vietnam cement planter

Shape Round

Brand: Hoang pottery

Usage: Indoor , Outdoor

With its handsome woven design, this planter looks good indoors and out. It’s available in a number of sizes and attractive colors to fit your plant’s needs and your unique style and is well-made of durable plastic to be able to withstand the elements. Its Vietnam Light Cement Trough finish ensures it will stay colorful for years to come. We know how important it is to have a little extra green in your life and this is just the planter you need to keep life thriving.

Add a touch of old-country charm to your home and garden with this beautifully aged ceramic plant holder. Display all your wonderful floral arrangements and colourful plants in this antique-looking plant pot.Vietnam Light Cement Trough displaying scrolling flowers of deep indigo and white tones.

Love this Pot. I have put a Petunia in it on the step. It looks antique & I like the rubber pads underneath to stop it slipping. It would look lovely inside too. Very pleased with this although I did have to wait a while to get the pot holder delivered. Having said that customer services are very good and deal with any issues promptly and with care.

How to make a lightweight concrete pots

Make a Vietnam lightweight concrete pots

Material

Vietnam lightweiaght concrete pot

Vietnam lightweiaght concrete pot

Portland cement

Pearlite and peat moss

Vietnam lightweight concrete pots

Vietnam lightweight concrete pots

I mixed the hypertufa in a large  container, following these directions. When mixing that particular batch, added one part sand, to equal parts cement, Pearlite and peat moss for added strength.

tips: when mixing that it required more water than the mixture without sand.

Transfer mixture to Plastic container

Place this container in plastic bag in 36 hours

Vietnam lightweight concrete pots

Vietnam lightweight concrete pots

Vietnam concrete pots

After 36 hours,emove the planter from container and dry outside in 1-2 weeks

We have a lightweight concrete pots here. Then fill them with dirt and whatever flowers your little heart desires. I mainly use flowers that will grow and eventually drape over the edge of the buckets (ivy, vinca vine, petunias, Calibrachoa etc).Now it’s look great!!!!

Vietnam concrete pot

Vietnam concrete pot

Hoang Pottery Ltd was started in 2003, supplying pottery to worldwide markets from their Dragon Kilns in Binh Duong.Our company situated in Binh Duong, Vietnam offers you a wide range of products: for outdoor use and indoor use, also furniture and garden decoration items for your garden. All our products are 100% hand made. Our products are made of various materials such as ceramic , glazed terracotta, red terracotta, black terracotta, zinc, light cement, light terrazzo,…. For the past years we have put a lot of efforts to our our design capability to meet the demands of the most stringent boutique retailers, and have expanded our manufacturing capacity to fulfill the orders of many large international retailers. Customer satisfaction is one of our top priorities.

Read more here